Updates

At 54.5 mpg, a big step forward.

In July 2011, President Obama announced plans for nationwide clean car standards that will require new cars and light trucks to meet an average of 54.5 miles per gallon through 2025. The work of Environment Connecticut’s staff, members and allies to adopt clean car standards here in Connecticut as far back as 2004 helped pave the way for this step — the single biggest step our nation has ever taken to end its addiction to oil. Nathan Willcox, our federal global warming program director, had the honor of thanking the president in person.

News Release | Environment Connecticut

Back To The Future: State Budget Raids Ratepayer Clean Energy Funds – Again

Hartford, CT – “In the words of Yogi Berra, it's 'déjà vu all over again' at the state capitol this year. Once again the legislature is resorting to a budget-balancing gimmick used repeatedly in previous years that hurts electric ratepayers, kills jobs, and harms our environment.

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News Release | Environment Connecticut

Advocates Oppose Clean Energy Rollback

Environment Connecticut and a coalition of environmental and consumer advocates, faith-based organizations, clean energy businesses, and labor stood together to oppose rollbacks to Connecticut's renewable electricity standard. 

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News Release | Environment Connecticut

Connecticut and Other Northeast States Plan Deeper Cuts in Power Plant Pollution

Power plant pollution in the Northeast would decline by more than 20 percent in the next decade under a plan announced on February 7th by  environmental regulators and energy officials from 9 Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states.  

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News Release

Connecticut Reaps Public Health Benefits from Wind Energy

Hartford – Environment Connecticut released a new Environment Connecticut Research & Policy Center report today that shows that New England’s current power generation from wind energy avoids 720 tons of smog-causing and 1,370 tons of soot pollution annually, a significant benefit for public health in Connecticut, a state heavily affected by air pollution.

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Report | Environment Connecticut Research and Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

Coal and natural gas-fired power plants pollute our air, are major contributors to global warming, and consume vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. Wind energy has none of these problems. It produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

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