News Release | Environment Connecticut

Obama Administration to Protect Connecticut Residents’ Health by Setting Carbon Pollution Standards for New Power Plants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed historic new limits on carbon pollution from new power plants.  Carbon pollution fuels global warming, which leads to poor air quality that triggers asthma attacks and other respiratory problems.  Scientists also predict that global warming will lead to more devastating floods, more deadly heat waves and the spread of infectious diseases. Coal-fired power plants are the largest single source of carbon pollution in the U.S., yet there are currently no federal limits on this pollution from power plants.  The standard proposed today will correct that for new power plants by limiting their emissions of carbon pollution.

News Release | Environment Connecticut

President Obama Announces Landmark Mercury Standard for Power Plants

Today, President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the first-ever nationwide standard for mercury and air toxics pollution from power plants. A record 907,000 Americans submitted comments on the standard, which is expected to cut toxic mercury pollution from power plants by 91 percent.

News Release | Environment Connecticut

New Report Ranks States and Power Plants for Mercury Pollution

A new report ranks states and power plants nationwide according to their emissions of mercury, and outlines the public health threats of mercury pollution. 

Report | Environment Connecticut

America's Biggest Mercury Polluters: How Cleaning up the Dirtiest Power Plants will Protect Public Health

Power plants continue to release large amounts of toxic pollutants, including mercury, into our air. In 2010, two-thirds of all airborne mercury pollution in the United States came from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants.

News Release | Environment Connecticut

Connecticut House Delegation Votes To Protect Public Health

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives passed by a vote of 262-161 a bill blocking critical health protections against mercury and other toxic air pollution from cement plants (H.R. 2681). This bill continues the trend of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s (R-VA) pollution agenda putting polluters over people and gutting life-saving clean air protections. All five of Connecticut’s Representatives opposed this bill.

Report | Environment Connecticut Research & Policy Center

Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011

All Americans should be able to breathe clean air.  But pollution from power plants and vehicles puts the health of our nation’s children and families at risk.  Ground-level ozone, the main component of smog, is one of the most harmful and one of the most pervasive air pollutants.  According to the American Lung Association, nearly half of all Americans – 48 percent – still live in areas with unhealthy levels of smog pollution.  Studies show that on days with high concentrations of smog pollution in the air, children and adults suffer more asthma attacks, increased respiratory difficulty, and reduced lung function.  Exposure to smog pollution can exacerbate respiratory illness and even cause premature death.  Sensitive populations including children, the elderly, and people with respiratory illness are particularly at risk of the adverse health effects of air pollution.

Result

Attacks on public health defeated—for now.

The coal lobby and their allies are trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March 2011, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. In April, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution.