Result

Attacks on public health defeated—for now.

The coal lobby and their allies are trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March 2011, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. In April, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution.

Result

A step closer to restoring Long Island Sound.

From Hammonasset Beach to Rocky Neck State Park, Long Island Sound is closer to restoration thanks in part to the efforts of a coalition of activists and local businesses, including Environment Connecticut, who were successful in recent years in our efforts to restore funding to the state’s Clean Water Fund.

Result

At 54.5 mpg, a big step forward.

In July 2011, President Obama announced plans for nationwide clean car standards that will require new cars and light trucks to meet an average of 54.5 miles per gallon through 2025. The work of Environment Connecticut’s staff, members and allies to adopt clean car standards here in Connecticut as far back as 2004 helped pave the way for this step — the single biggest step our nation has ever taken to end its addiction to oil. Nathan Willcox, our federal global warming program director, had the honor of thanking the president in person.

Result

Saving—and strengthening—the Bottle Bill

Back in 1978, our staff helped pass Connecticut’s Bottle Bill. In 2004, with the help of a strong coalition, we fought back against industry lobbyists pushing for its repeal. And in 2009, we won an expansion of the Bottle Bill to include bottled water—which will keep hundreds of millions of plastic bottles from littering our roads, parks and beaches every year.

Result

Restoring protection to Long Island Sound

Long Island Sound could soon be better protected from pollution and development. At the urging of our staff and members, the Obama administration recently moved to restore protections to 3,000 miles of streams that feed the sound — and the drinking water for six in 10 people in the state. Now we're working to make sure the strongest Clean Water Act makes it over the finish line.

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