New Connecticut law bans PFAS in food packaging, firefighting foam

A new Connecticut law promises to reduce the contamination of our health and environment by dangerous PFAS chemicals that have been linked to cancer, birth defects and more.

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Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.

A new Connecticut law promises to reduce the contamination of our health and environment by dangerous PFAS chemicals that have been linked to cancer, birth defects and more.

PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, never break down once they enter our environment or our bodies. That’s why Environment Connecticut celebrated on July 20, when Gov. Ned Lamont signed a bill that bans these dangerous “forever chemicals” from food packaging and firefighting foam.

"The best way to protect our drinking water from PFAS is to stop using them," said John Rumpler, clean water program director for our national network. "Connecticut's new law takes a vital step toward turning off the tap on these 'forever chemicals.'"

Environment Connecticut and our national network will continue working to turn off the PFAS tap and keep these dangerous chemicals out of our waterways, our backyards and our bodies.

Read more about the law.

Learn more about federal efforts to stop PFAS contamination. 

Photo: The law promises to keep more PFAS chemicals — like those found in firefighting foam — out of our environment. Credit: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality via Flickr CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.