Updates

At 54.5 mpg, a big step forward.

In July 2011, President Obama announced plans for nationwide clean car standards that will require new cars and light trucks to meet an average of 54.5 miles per gallon through 2025. The work of Environment Connecticut’s staff, members and allies to adopt clean car standards here in Connecticut as far back as 2004 helped pave the way for this step — the single biggest step our nation has ever taken to end its addiction to oil. Nathan Willcox, our federal global warming program director, had the honor of thanking the president in person.

Blog Post

These ‘Shining Cities’ will get you inspired about a sunny future | Ross Sherman

Cities and towns of all sizes are driving the transition to solar energy.

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Report | Environment Connecticut

Shining Cities 2018: How Smart Local Policies Are Expanding Solar Power in America

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 53 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power 10.1 million homes and 26 times as much capacity as was installed at the end of 2010.[1] Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them.

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News Release | Environment America

Wrong Direction on Clean Cars -- EPA Receives Citizen Citation

Today, rightfully-concerned Americans descended upon the Environmental Protection Agency to give EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt a ticket -- for heading in the wrong direction on federal clean car standards.

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Report | Environment Connecticut Research and Policy Center

Wind Power to Spare: The Enormous Energy Potential of Atlantic Offshore Wind

The Atlantic coast states are dependent on fossil fuels, which pollute our air, put our health at risk, and contribute to global warming. In response, states in the region are moving toward an energy system powered by clean, renewable sources: Atlantic states now generate enough wind and solar energy to power nearly 2 million homes, 19 times more than just a decade ago.

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Report | Environment Connecticut Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters 2018

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

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